CANON LAW; Canons of the Apostles

While reading Remembering The Armenian Genocide of 1915 I began to question... again;

  • where did this acceptance of child marriage begin?  
  • Is child defined as pre-puberty 10-14 years old, 18 or younger.  
  • When did it become acceptable to have sex with 3 year old children?
  •  Was this acceptable in every society?  

It was in Babylon after the exile under Nebuchadnezzar

in 597 BC that Judaism's leading sages probably began to

indulge in pedophilia. Babylon was the staggeringly immoral

capitol of the ancient world.

We find it in the Quron, the Talmud (keep in mind always that the Talmud is NOT the book of writings we "Gentiles" call the Old Testament, or Torah), many eastern philosophies and so can't leave out rampant perversion in the Catholic Church which always brings me back to the beginnings of the "Church" and the usurpation of "Christianity" which is where I'll begin this blog... again.  Their hands are in everything.

Looking at the main article: Canons of the Apostles we find a system of laws and legal principles made and enforced by the Church's hierarchical authorities

The Apostolic Canons or Ecclesiastical Canons of the Same Holy Apostles is a collection of ancient ecclesiastical decrees (eighty-five in the Eastern, fifty in the Western Church) concerning the government and discipline of the Early Christian Church, incorporated with the Apostolic Constitutions which are part of the Ante-Nicene Fathers In the fourth century the First Council of Nicaea (325) calls canons the disciplinary measures of the Church: the term canon, κανὠν, means in Greek, a rule. There is a very early distinction between the rules enacted by the Church and the legislative measures taken by the State called leges, Latin for laws.

Scale of justice, canon law.svg
This article is part of the series:
Legislation and Legal System of the Catholic Church
Canon Law Task Force

The Roman Catholic Church canon law also includes the main five rites (groups) of churches which are in full union with the Roman Catholic Church and the Supreme Pontiff:

  1. Alexandrian Rite Churches which include the Coptic Catholic Church and Ethiopian Catholic Church.
  2. West Syrian Rite which includes the Maronite ChurchSyriac Catholic Church and the Syro-Malankara Church.
  3. Armenian Rite Church which includes the Armenian Catholic Church.
  4. Byzantine Rite Churches which include the Albanian Byzantine Catholic ChurchBelarusian Greek Catholic ChurchBulgarian ChurchByzantine Church of Croatia, Serbia and MontenegroGreek ChurchHungarian Greek Catholic ChurchItalo-Albanian ChurchMacedonian Greek Catholic ChurchMelkite ChurchRomanian Church United with Rome, Greek-CatholicRussian ChurchRuthenian ChurchSlovak Greek Catholic Churchand Ukrainian Catholic Church.
  5. East Syrian Rite Churches which includes the Chaldean Church and Syro-Malabar Church.
  6.  

*All of these church groups are in full communion with the Pope and subject to the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches.

In the Roman Church, universal positive ecclesiastical laws, based upon either immutable divine and natural law, or changeable circumstantial and merely positive law, derive formal authority and promulgation from the office of pope, who as Supreme Pontiff possesses the totality of legislative, executive, and judicial power in his person.

The Catholic Church has what is claimed to be the oldest continuously functioning internal legal system inWestern Europe, much later than Roman law but predating the evolution of modern European civil law traditions. What began with rules ("canons") adopted by the Apostles at the Council of Jerusalem in the first century has developed into a highly complex legal system encapsulating not just norms of the New Testament, but some elements of the Hebrew (Old Testament), RomanVisigothicSaxon, and Celtic legal traditions.

The history of Latin canon law can be divided into four periods: the jus antiquum, the jus novum, the jus novissimum and the Code of Canon Law. In relation to the Code, history can be divided into the jus vetus (all law before the Code) and the jus novum (the law of the Code, or jus codicis).

The canon law of the Eastern Catholic Churches, which had developed some different disciplines and practices, underwent its own process of codification, resulting in the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches promulgated in 1990 by Pope John Paul II.

The Code for the Eastern Churches

The law of the Eastern Catholic Churches in full union with Rome was in much the same state as that of the Latin or Western Church before 1917; much more diversity in legislation existed in the various Eastern Catholic Churches. Each had its own special law, in which custom still played an important part. In 1929 Pius XI informed the Eastern Churches of his intention to work out a Code for the whole of the Eastern Church. The publication of these Codes for the Eastern Churches regarding the law of persons was made between 1949 through 1958 but finalized nearly 30 years later.

The first Code of Canon Law, 1917, was mostly for the Roman Rite, with limited application to the Eastern Churches. After the Second Vatican Council, (1962 - 1965), another edition was published specifically for the Roman Rite in 1983. Most recently, 1990, the Vatican produced the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches which became the 1st code of Eastern Catholic Canon Law.

Orthodox Churches

The Greek-speaking Orthodox have collected canons and commentaries upon them in a work known as the Pēdálion (Greek: Πηδάλιον, "Rudder"), so named because it is meant to "steer" the Church. The Orthodox Christian tradition in general treats its canons more as guidelines than as laws, the bishops adjusting them to cultural and other local circumstances. Some Orthodox canon scholars point out that, had the Ecumenical Councils (which deliberated in Greek) meant for the canons to be used as laws, they would have called them nómoi/νόμοι (laws) rather than kanónes/κανόνες (rules), but almost all Orthodox conform to them. The dogmatic decisions of the Councils, though, are to be obeyed rather than to be treated as guidelines, since they are essential for the Church's unity

Anglican Communion

In the Church of England, the ecclesiastical courts that formerly decided many matters such as disputes relating to marriage, divorce, wills, and defamation, still have jurisdiction of certain church-related matters (e.g. discipline of clergy, alteration of church property, and issues related to churchyards). Their separate status dates back to the 12th century when the Normans split them off from the mixed secular/religious county and local courts used by the Saxons. In contrast to the other courts of England the law used in ecclesiastical matters is at least partially a civil law system, not common law, although heavily governed by parliamentary statutes. Since the Reformation, ecclesiastical courts in England have been royal courts. The teaching of canon law at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge was abrogated by Henry VIII; thereafter practitioners in the ecclesiastical courts were trained in civil law, receiving a Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) degree from Oxford, or a Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) degree from Cambridge. Such lawyers (called "doctors" and "civilians") were centered at "Doctors Commons", a few streets south of St Paul's Cathedral in London, where they monopolized probate, matrimonial, and admiralty cases until their jurisdiction was removed to the common law courts in the mid-19th century.

Other churches in the Anglican Communion around the world (e.g., the Episcopal Church in the United States, and the Anglican Church of Canada) still function under their own private systems of canon law.

Currently, (2004), there are principles of canon law common to the churches within the Anglican Communion; their existence can be factually established; each province or church contributes through its own legal system to the principles of canon law common within the Communion; these principles have a strong persuasive authority and are fundamental to the self-understanding of each of the churches of the Communion; these principles have a living force, and contain in themselves the possibility of further development; and the existence of these principles both demonstrates unity and promotes unity within the Anglican Communion. 

Presbyterian and Reformed churches

Main article: Presbyterian polity

In Presbyterian and Reformed churches, canon law is known as "practice and procedure" or "church order", and includes the church's laws respecting its government, discipline, legal practice and worship.

Roman canon law had been criticized by the Presbyterian as early as 1572 in the Admonition to Parliament. The protest centered around the standard defense that canon law could be retained so long as it did not contradict the civil law. According to Polly Ha, the Reformed Church Government refuted this claiming that the bishops had been enforcing canon law for 1500 years.

Lutheranism

The Book of Concord is the historic doctrinal statement of the Lutheran Church, consisting of ten credal documents recognized as authoritative in Lutheranism since the 16th century. However, the Book of Concord is a confessional document (stating orthodox belief) rather than a book of ecclesiastical rules or discipline, like canon law. Each Lutheran national church establishes its own system of church order and discipline, though these are referred to as "canons."

The United Methodist Church

The Book of Discipline contains the laws, rules, policies and guidelines for The United Methodist Church. Its last edition was published in 2012.

See also

Of course this does not answer the inital question about children and child abuse but its a fantastic linked start and the connections to the attached religions that align to pay "homage" to the Catholic Church grows. I've been in a few of these congregations and indeed the service begins by announcing we are gathered there to pay homage to the Catholic Church.

http://amazingdiscoveries.org/S-deception-Sabbath_Sunday_Catholic_Church

http://messianic-revolution.com/2-10-protestants-pay-homage-catholic-church-worshipping-sundays/

http://www.reddit.com/r/religion/comments/2s5fqb/protestants_pay_homage_to_the_catholic_church_by/

To be continued>>>>

Comment

You need to be a member of THE DUSTY COVER to add comments!

ABOUT

TPS was created in 2011, in time for our first 9/11 Truth Marathon.  Many thanks to Jim and SkyBlueEyes for helping with the background design and layout and Sky, BP, IC Freedom and others for all the hours spent in the Conference room for our Popcorn & Movie Topic Nights.

You'll find the information and documentary studies in our  Popcorn & Movie Topic Night Archives

Need Site HELP? Click the Button!

Now sharing convenient ways to shop from several countries. Click the graphic below:

If you are on a Site page and see GREEN words it's probably a link ;-)  If you'd like additional help posting on site click the HELP button below.

    Link too long?  Tiny it here 

Blog Posts

A Visitor from the Past

Posted by Sojourner on December 9, 2017 at 10:31am 0 Comments

TEETERING ON THE EDGE

Posted by Sojourner on June 10, 2017 at 12:02pm 0 Comments

© 2018   Created by ThePeriledSea.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service